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What is the difference between a Macchiato vs. a Latte?

What Makes Macchiato Different From Latte?
June 1, 2013


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What is Macchiato?

• It means spotted or marked in Italian.
• Thus, if you would say Caffe Macchiato, then that would be the Italian term for marked coffee.
• If you would look at the ingredients of a Macchiato, you would know that it is actually a caffee latte that is only marked to avoid confusion.
• This kind of coffee came to life to easily distinguish a cup of espresso with milk from the standard espresso without milk. Baristas marked espressos with milk for them to avoid serving the wrong cup to their customers.
• If you would order a Macchiato now in your favorite coffee shop, don’t be surprised to find added foam instead of steamed milk in the drink that you have ordered. This is just an innovation that the Americans did to the standard Macchiato.

What is Latte?

• It actually means milk in Italian.
• The concept of mixing coffee with latte came from United States.
• Lino Meiorin is the man behind the American latte. He is a Californian barista trained by an Italian. He just added lots of milk to the standard Italian cappuccinos to reduce its bitter taste and turn in into the caffelatte that it now known by several people all over the world.
• The modern latte is now added with foam. Thus, if you really want to experience authentic Italian latte, then you would have to visit Italy or find a good Italian coffee shop in your area.
• If you would order a latte in one of the restaurants in Italy, then you can expect to receive a cup full of milk with no coffee in it. If you want coffee in your milk, then tell the server that you want a caffelatte and not latte alone.
• If you would order a latte in another country, then you would be given a particular type of coffee.

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