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What is Christmas and why is it celebrated?

Can you tell me more about Christmas?
November 5, 2013


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All about Christmas

• It is the day celebrated by most Christians. Some of them especially those who belong to the group of Jehovah’s Witnesses don’t celebrate it for they consider Christ as a very holy entity.
• This day marks the birth of their savior Jesus Christ. He is the Son of God who is the Creator of the universe.
• It is also considered as Christianity’s birthday since the religion mainly revolves around Jesus Christ.
• This day falls on December 25 even though some experts suggest that the savior was born during the spring season. Nevertheless, this theory of Sextus Julius Africanus (a Christian missionary in the third century) was accepted by the Romans when they eventually switched to being Christians.
• Historians suggest that the first Christmas celebration happened during the early part of the fourth century CE.
• Several Christmas traditions nowadays came from Jolly Old England. This is why it’s hard to believe that the celebration was used to be banned in that area from 1647 to 1660.
• When Christians are asked about Christmas, they usually envision a cold winter night and shepherds in the snow during the time when the savior was born.
• On the other hand, The Christmas Carol of Charles Dickens is most probably the reason why we now celebrate Christmas with all of our loved ones. The commemoration of Jesus Christ’s birth has definitely gone a long way. It has changed through time and it now has a warm feel to it.
• If you’re wondering who started linking Santa Claus with Christmas, then you have a 1822 poem entitled “A Visit from Saint Nicholas” which was written by Clement Clarke Moore to blame for that. Now, would you believe that Thor used to be the version of Santa Claus in the past?

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